Train adventures in Canada

Riding the train across Canada has been on my bucket list for some years. It has just come off. I’ve done a short part of it (36 hours) and the experience on the train was as great as is reported. I have a few niggles about what was delivered not quite being what is advertised but the biggest issue is communication.

Edmonton at dusk

Passenger trains here in Canada use lines owned by the freight company so always have to give way. In addition, someone died on the train at an earlier stage. However, it is with the communication of the 10 hour delay that I take issue. Because we had booked directly we got an email that the train was delayed (hurrah for that email) and Via Rail suggested that we phone every couple of hours. Neither their website nor their Titter account made any mention of the delay. Their app didn’t recognise the train at all, which was a useful cop-out. When we phoned, the Via Rail person had to check on the situation each time; so it was not on their screen? The problem was that we got conflicting information each time we rang. Most of this country has 24/7 electricity supply and a corresponding telecommunications infrastructure and service. Via Rail do seem, however, to regard the train as a new technology and, if they are able to track it, which seems unlikely, they don’t tell their staff or customers.

Having to set the alarm to ring for updates in the middle of the night is outrageous when the train, we learnt later, was still many hours away. A 10 hour delay means changed accommodation and connection arrangements at each end but Via Rail take no responsibility for that on the grounds that they don’t guarantee arrival times. Using this train for anything other than part of a vacation would be unwise … ‘I’ll try to make the meeting on Wednesday but I might be a day or so late’!! That wouldn’t wash.

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Smooth tram-train link – finally!

Hurrah! Edinburgh finally has a covered, more-or-less warm and step-free link between the tram and the Fife train line – Edinburgh Gateway. If that wasn’t exciting enough there is a heater which can be operated by the travelling public. This is in the waiting area, out of the wind and rain which is so often a feature of our train stations in Scotland. Well done ScotRail!

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